No More Chinese Communist Party

April 16, 2010

Nanjing, Nanjing! City of Life and Death:Total double standard

This movie pissed off some Chinese people because some need to think of the Japanese as non-human monsters. I can sympathize with that, but I also think that most people can be turned to evil pretty easily unless they are super strong. So it’s hard to say those people were worse than some other people. They were human but were probably at least in some sense, victims of circumstance.

I think that it is good to denounce those kinds of atrocities, but it just shows that the Chinese people are blind with regards to what atrocities the communist party has committed against the Chinese people. Propaganda and information blocks keep the communist party safe from this kind of denouncement.

The Telegraph: Lu Chuan, the boyish 39-year-old director of Nanjing, Nanjing! City of Life and Death, is blunt about the making of his movie. “It was a journey to hell,” he says.

Lu’s film plunges into the horror of the rape of Nanjing, a massacre that has been largely forgotten in the West, but is still painfully raw in Chinese minds.

When Nanjing fell to the Japanese on December 13, 1937, a six week orgy of violence was unleashed that rivalled the worst atrocities of the Second World War.

Lu cast Hideo Nakaizumi as Kadokawa, a Japanese haunted by his inability to stop the slaughter ordered by his superior officers. “I just thought it was the right thing to do,” says Lu. “I thought I could deliver a new message and perhaps persuade some people who had mistaken ideas about the war. Japanese soldiers also paid a price during the war, and that theme got me the most criticism.”

“It was all quite scary,” he says now. “The response was overwhelming, all the criticism and the scolding. Even my teachers from film school attacked it.” What ignited the fury? “They basically could not accept that I tried to portray Japanese soldiers as humans, rather than beasts.”

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